H-1B Status

H-1B status is for individuals with specialty occupations coming to the U.S. temporarily to perform services of a professional nature. Under current regulations, H-1B status is granted for an initial period of three years, and a three year extension is possible for a maximum duration of six years. H-1B petition is employer specific. 

Dependents of H-1B holders are eligible for H-4 status. H-4 holders are not eligible to work in the U.S.

UCLA will support H-1B status for an individual who has been offered a full-time temporary position as a faculty member, researcher, or other professional which is critical to the institution's academic or research mission. Examples of payroll titles which qualify are Lecturer or higher faculty title, Postdoctoral Scholar (3252), Staff Research Associate II or higher, and Programmer/Analyst II or higher. A job offer of three or more years is required. UCLA students are not eligible for UCLA H-1B petition sponsorship.

New H-1B Cases

Current UCLA policy requires that an outside attorney be retained to assist with all new H-1B cases. The Dashew Center will provide counseling in determining strategies for a case and selecting an attorney; review documents prepared by the attorney; ensure compliance with UCLA’s policy, procedure, and format; obtain university signatures; and provide status reports.

To begin the process of obtaining H-1B status, the Department Contact should get in touch with Davis del Pino, Niño Abueg or Sylvia Ottemoeller as early as possible by phone or email. Be prepared to answer the following questions when you contact the counselor: what is the position offered, what is the salary, what visa status does the individual currently hold, what is the expiration date of current status, and who will be paying the attorney fees.

H-1B Extension Cases

Current UCLA policy requires that an outside attorney be retained to assist with all extension H-1B cases.

The department must submit the documents to the Dashew Center no later than three months before the current H-1B status expires. It may be submitted up to six months prior to the current H expiration date